Anterior Deltoid Exercises

Anterior Deltoid Exercises

The deltoid muscles, commonly referred to as delts, are a group of three individual muscles located in the shoulder region: the anterior deltoid, lateral deltoid, and posterior deltoid. Together, they form the rounded contour of the shoulder and play a crucial role in various upper body movements.

  1. Anterior Deltoid: The front portion of the deltoid muscle, responsible for flexing the shoulder joint and lifting the arm to the front. Exercises that target the anterior deltoid include shoulder presses, front raises, and chest fly variations.
  2. Lateral Deltoid: The middle portion of the deltoid muscle, responsible for abducting the shoulder joint (lifting the arm to the side) and stabilizing the shoulder during overhead movements. Exercises that target the lateral deltoid include lateral raises, upright rows, and lateral deltoid raises.
  3. Posterior Deltoid: The rear portion of the deltoid muscle, responsible for extending the shoulder joint (moving the arm backward) and assisting in movements like pulling and rowing. Exercises that target the posterior deltoid include rear deltoid flies, reverse fly variations, and face pulls.

Overall, the deltoid muscles are involved in a wide range of shoulder movements, including pushing, pulling, and lifting. Strengthening the deltoids is essential for improving shoulder stability, enhancing posture, and supporting functional movements in everyday life and athletic activities. Proper form and technique are crucial when performing deltoid exercises to prevent injury and maximize muscle engagement.

Strengthening

Overhead Press:
• Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and grasp a barbell with a palms-forward grip.
• Clean the barbell to your shoulders.
• Stand straight and press the barbell overhead until your arms are fully extended.
• Lower the barbell back to your shoulders and repeat.

Front Raises:
• Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell in each hand.
• Keep palms facing the floor and raise both arms to the front, until they are parallel to the floor.
• Lower the dumbbells back to the starting position.

Incline Bench Press:
• Lie on an incline bench with feet firmly on the floor.
• Grasp a barbell with a palms-forward grip and lower the barbell to your chest.
• Press the barbell up, extending your arms fully.
• Lower the barbell back to your chest and repeat.

Push Up:
• Get into a plank position with hands placed slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.
• Lower your body until your chest almost touches the ground.
• Push back up to the starting position.

Dip:
• Grasp the bars of a dip station.
• Lower your body by bending your arms until your upper arms are parallel to the floor.
• Push back up to the starting position.

Upright Row:
• Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a barbell with a palms-down grip.
• Keep elbows close to your body and raise the barbell to your chin.
• Lower the barbell back to the starting position.

Battle Ropes:
• Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold an end of the battle rope in each hand.
• Move the ropes up and down, alternately, in a whipping motion.
• Repeat for the desired number of repetitions or time.

Stretching

Standing Reverse Shoulder Stretch:
• Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart.
• Hold your right arm straight up, with your elbow bent and your hand behind your head.
• Use your left hand to gently pull your right elbow towards your left ear.
• Hold the stretch for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides.

Assisted Reverse Shoulder Stretch:
• Stand facing a wall and place your hand on it at shoulder height.
• Take a step back with one foot and keep the other foot forward.
• Keep your arm straight and lean forward, feeling a stretch in your shoulder.
• Hold the stretch for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides.

Doorway Stretch:
• Stand in a doorway with one hand on each side.
• Step forward with one foot and bend your front knee.
• Keep your back leg straight and hold the stretch for 15-30 seconds.

Lying Chest Stretch:
• Lie on your back on a mat or the floor.
• Hold a towel or resistance band behind your back with both hands, keeping your elbows straight.
• Gently pull the towel or band upward, feeling a stretch in your shoulders.
• Hold the stretch for 15-30 seconds.

If you are suffering from any shoulder pain or weakness, feel free to get in touch with one of our personal trainers and exercise professionals via email info@livewellhealth.co.uk or telephone number 0330 043 2501

Why should you learn how to lift weights?

Why should you learn how to lift weights?

There are many reasons why learning how to lift weights can be beneficial to your overall health and well-being. Here are some of the main reasons:

  1. Strength and muscle development: Lifting weights is one of the best ways to increase your strength and build muscle. Regular strength training can help you increase muscle mass, which can help you burn more calories and improve your overall body composition.
  2. Improved bone density: Resistance training has been shown to help improve bone density, which can be especially important for older adults or individuals at risk for osteoporosis.
  3. Better metabolic health: Strength training can improve your metabolic health by increasing insulin sensitivity and reducing inflammation; This can help reduce your risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.
  4. Increased functional fitness: Strength training can also help improve your overall fitness and ability to perform everyday tasks such as carrying groceries, climbing stairs, or lifting heavy objects.
  5. Better mental health: Exercise, including lifting weights, has been shown to have a positive impact on mental health by reducing stress, anxiety, and depression symptoms.

Learning to lift weights can help you build strength, improve your body composition, reduce your risk of chronic diseases, and enhance your mental well-being.

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch. Furthermore, if you are including weight lifting into your regime and they are causing you some aches and pains, then we can help there too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk

Exercises to target the glutes?

Exercises to target the glutes?

Here are some exercises that can help strengthen and tone the glutes:

  1. Squats: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and lower your body as if sitting in a chair. Keep your knees aligned with your toes and push back up through your heels.
  2. Lunges: Step forward with one foot and lower your body until your front knee is bent at a 90-degree angle. Keep your back knee off the ground and push back up through your front heel. Repeat with the other leg.
  3. Deadlifts: Stand with your feet hip-width apart and hold a barbell or dumbbell in front of your thighs. Hinge at the hips and lower the weight towards the ground, keeping your back flat. Squeeze your glutes to come back up to standing.
  4. Glute bridges: Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the ground. Lift your hips towards the ceiling, squeezing your glutes at the top. Lower back down and repeat.
  5. Step-ups: Step onto a box or bench with one foot and drive your opposite knee towards your chest. Step back down and repeat with the other leg.

Remember to start with light weights and gradually increase them as you get stronger. It’s also essential to maintain proper form to avoid injury.

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch. Furthermore, if you are including glute exercises into your regime and they are causing you some aches and pains, then we can help there too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk

Exercises to help with lower back pain

Exercises to help with lower back pain

Stretching

Child Pose:

  • Begin on your hands and knees, with your knees hip-width apart and your feet together.
  • Lower your hips back towards your heels while stretching your arms out in front of you.
  • Rest your forehead on the ground and hold the pose for 30-60 seconds, breathing deeply.

Cat/Cow Poses:

  • Begin on your hands and knees, with your wrists under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
  • Inhale and arch your back, lifting your head and tailbone towards the ceiling (Cow pose).
  • Exhale and round your spine towards the ceiling, tucking your chin to your chest and bringing your tailbone towards your knees (Cat pose).
  • Repeat the sequence several times, moving smoothly between the two poses.

Knee to Chest with Rotation:

  • Lie flat on your back with your legs extended.
  • Bend your right knee and bring it towards your chest.
  • Keep your left leg extended on the ground and hold onto your right knee with both hands.
  • Rotate your right knee to the left, keeping your right shoulder on the ground.
  • Repeat on the other side.

Both Knees to Chest:

  • Lie flat on your back with your legs extended.
  • Bend both knees and bring them towards your chest.
  • Hold onto your knees with both hands and breathe deeply, feeling the stretch in your lower back.
  • Release the pose and repeat several times.

Figure 4 Stretch:

  • Lie flat on your back with your legs extended.
  • Bend your right knee and place your ankle on your left knee.
  • Reach through your legs and hold onto your left thigh.
  • Pull your left knee towards your chest, feeling the stretch in your right glutes and hip.
  • Repeat on the other side.

Sitting Spinal Stretch:

  • Sit on the floor with your legs crossed.
  • Reach your arms up overhead, interlocking your fingers and stretching your spine.
  • Keep your back straight and hold the pose for 30-60 seconds, breathing deeply.

Hamstring Stretch with Towel:

  • Sit on the floor with your legs extended in front of you.
  • Loop a towel around the sole of your right foot and hold the ends of the towel with both hands.
  • Keeping your knee straight, lift your right foot towards the ceiling until you feel a stretch in your hamstring.
  • Hold the stretch for 30-60 seconds, breathing deeply.
  • Repeat on the other side.

Strengthening

Dead Bug:

  • Lie flat on your back with your arms extended overhead and legs in the air, bent at a 90-degree angle at the knees.
  • Lower your left arm and right leg toward the floor at the same time, keeping your lower back pressed into the floor.
  • Return to the starting position and repeat on the other side, lowering your right arm and left leg.

Bird Dog:

  • Begin on your hands and knees, keeping your hands directly under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
  • Simultaneously extend your right arm and left leg, keeping your back flat and your core engaged.
  • Hold for a few seconds and then return to the starting position.
  • Repeat with your left arm and right leg.

Forearm Plank:

  • Start in a push-up position, but instead of resting on your hands, rest on your forearms.
  • Keep your body in a straight line from head to heels and engage your core to maintain stability.
  • Hold for 30-60 seconds, or as long as you can maintain proper form.

Lying Windshield Wipers:

  • Lie flat on your back with your arms extended out to the sides.
  • Raise your legs until they are perpendicular to the floor.
  • Slowly lower your legs to one side, keeping your lower back pressed into the floor.
  • Bring your legs back to the center and then lower them to the other side.

Slow Mountain Climber:

  • Start in a push-up position with your hands directly under your shoulders.
  • Slowly bring your right knee toward your chest, then return to the starting position.
  • Repeat with your left knee.
  • Continue alternating knees, keeping your core engaged and your back flat.

Hanging Knee Raises:

  • Hang from a pull-up bar with your palms facing away from your body.
  • Engage your core and raise your knees toward your chest.
  • Lower your legs back down and repeat for the desired number of repetitions.

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch. Furthermore, if you are including lower back exercises into your regime and they are causing you some aches and pains, then we can help there too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is a common condition that occurs when there is a compression of the rotator cuff tendons and bursa (a fluid-filled sac) between the acromion (a bony prominence on the shoulder blade) and the head of the humerus (upper arm bone). It is also known as subacromial impingement. This condition can occur in both athletes and non-athletes, and is more common in individuals over the age of 40. Subacromial impingement is a common condition caused by compression of the rotator cuff tendons and bursa between the acromion and the head of the humerus. It is often accompanied by rotator cuff tendinitis, which is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons. If left untreated, it can lead to partial or full thickness rotator cuff tears. Treatment options include physical therapy, corticosteroid injections, and surgery. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent progression and reduce risk of tears.

Anatomy

Shoulder impingement, also known as subacromial impingement, is a condition that occurs when there is compression of the rotator cuff tendons and the bursa between the acromion and the head of the humerus. The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that attach the humerus to the scapula, and acromion is a bony prominence that forms the roof of the shoulder joint. Impingement occurs when the space between the acromion and the head of the humerus becomes narrowed, causing the tendons and bursa to be compressed against the acromion. Common causes of impingement include anatomic variations of the acromion, degeneration of the rotator cuff tendons, overuse and trauma. Factors such as obesity, smoking, and diabetes can also contribute to the development of impingement, resulting in pain and weakness in the shoulder.

Diagnosis

Shoulder impingement is diagnosed through a combination of a physical examination, patient history, and imaging studies. The orthopedic surgeon will assess range of motion, strength, and pain in the affected shoulder, and perform specific tests such as the Neer test or Hawkins-Kennedy test. Imaging studies like X-ray or MRI can reveal degenerative changes in the bones and inflammation or tears in the rotator cuff tendons. A diagnosis of impingement is typically made when the patient has pain and weakness in the shoulder, and the physical examination and imaging studies reveal evidence of impingement. In some cases, a diagnostic injection may be done to confirm the diagnosis and to help to determine the best course of treatment.

Treatment

Shoulder impingement treatment usually begins with conservative measures such as rest, ice, and physical therapy. Medication and corticosteroid injections may also be used to reduce pain and inflammation. In more severe cases, or cases that don’t respond to conservative treatment, surgery such as subacromial decompression may be necessary. This involves removing a small portion of the acromion to create more space for the rotator cuff tendons and bursa. Physical therapy and exercises are essential for recovery after surgery. The treatment of shoulder impingement depends on the underlying cause of the condition and the severity of the symptoms.

Exercises

  • Pendulum exercises: This exercise helps to gently move the shoulder and improve range of motion. Stand with your good arm leaning on a table or wall for support, and let the affected arm hang down. Use your body weight to gently move the arm in small circles.
  • Isometric rotator cuff exercises: These exercises involve contracting the rotator cuff muscles without moving the arm. An example is the “empty can” exercise, which involves holding a light weight with the arm at a 90-degree angle to the body and squeezing the shoulder blade towards the spine.
  • Scapular stabilization exercises: These exercises help to strengthen the muscles that support the shoulder blade, such as the serratus anterior and the trapezius. An example is the “wall slide” exercise, which involves sliding the back against a wall while keeping the arms and elbows in contact with the wall.
  • Theraband exercises: This exercise helps to improve the strength of the rotator cuff muscles, such as the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus. An example is the “external rotation” exercise, which involves holding the theraband in one hand and turning the arm outwards against the resistance of the band.
  • Strengthening exercises: To improve shoulder strength, it’s recommended to do exercises such as shoulder press, lat pulldown, and rows. These exercises can be performed with free weights or resistance bands.

It’s important to note that exercises should be performed under the guidance of a physical therapist or other healthcare professional, to ensure that they are performed correctly and to avoid further injury.

Prevention

  • Maintain good posture: Keeping your shoulders back and down will help to reduce the stress on your rotator cuff tendons and decrease the risk of impingement.
  • Strengthen the rotator cuff muscles: Performing exercises that target these muscles can help to improve their strength and stability, which in turn can help to prevent impingement.
  • Avoid repetitive overhead motions: Repetitive motions like throwing a ball or lifting weights over your head can put stress on the rotator cuff tendons and increase the risk of impingement.
  • Take breaks when doing repetitive tasks: If you do a lot of overhead work or other repetitive tasks, take regular breaks to give your shoulders a rest.
  • Use proper technique when lifting: Using proper form when lifting can help to reduce the stress on your shoulder and decrease the risk of impingement.
  • Maintain a healthy weight: Being overweight can put extra stress on your shoulders and increase the risk of impingement.
  • Avoid smoking: Smoking is associated with increased risk of impingement due to the decreased blood flow and oxygenation in the shoulder.
  • Control chronic conditions: If you have a chronic condition such as diabetes, it’s important to control it to avoid the risk of impingement.
  • Wear the right equipment: If you play sports or engage in other activities that put your shoulders at risk, wear the appropriate protective gear to help prevent injury.
  • Listen to your body: if you experience pain or discomfort in your shoulder, it’s important to seek medical attention, rest the shoulder and avoid activities that exacerbate the pain.

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch. Furthermore, if you are including shoulder exercsises into your regime and they are causing you some aches and pains, then we can help there too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk

Exercises for Triceps

Strengthening

Triceps Extension:

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell in each hand.
  • Keep your elbows close to your body and bend your arms, lowering the weights behind your head.
  • Straighten your arms to raise the weights back to the starting position.

Triceps Pushdowns:

  • Stand facing a cable machine and attach a straight bar to the cable.
  • Grasp the bar with an overhand grip and keep your elbows close to your body.
  • Push the bar down until your arms are fully extended.
  • Return the bar to the starting position.

Triceps Kickbacks:

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell in each hand.
  • Bend forward from your hips and keep your back straight.
  • Keep your upper arms close to your sides and straighten your arms, extending the weights behind you.
  • Return the weights to the starting position.

Triceps Dips:

  • Grasp the bars of a dip station.
  • Lower your body by bending your arms until your upper arms are parallel to the floor.
  • Push back up to the starting position.

Overhead Triceps Extension:

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell overhead with both hands.
  • Keep your elbows close to your head and bend your arms, lowering the weight behind you.
  • Straighten your arms to raise the weight back to the starting position.

Skull Crushers:

  • Lie on a bench or mat with your feet flat on the floor.
  • Hold a barbell or dumbbells with an overhand grip and extend your arms straight up.
  • Lower the weights to your temples, then press back up to the starting position.

Stretching

Leaning stretch

  • Kneel away from chair
  • Lean forward to be parallel to floor
  • Place elbows on chair above head
  • Bend elbows to support you
  • Look at floor and line up head with neck and back
  • Elbows should be the only part of you touching the chair
  • Bring forearms towards neck and place hands on back of neck
  • Press torso towards floor while exhaling
  • Hold for 30 seconds

Overhead Triceps Stretch:

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart
  • Reach overhead with one arm and bend elbow
  • Bring hand towards upper back
  • Use other hand to gently press down on elbow
  • Hold stretch for 15-30 seconds, switch side

Wrist Pull:

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart
  • Hold one arm out in front of you with your palm facing down
  • Use your other hand to gently pull your fingers towards your wrist
  • Hold the stretch for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides

Cross-Body Triceps Stretch:

  • Stand with feet shoulder-width apart
  • Reach across your body with one arm, placing hand on shoulder
  • Use other hand to gently press down on elbow
  • Hold stretch for 15-30 seconds, switch sides

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch. Furthermore, if you are including trcieps exercises into your regime and they are causing you some aches and pains, then we can help there too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk

Exercises for Sciatica

Stretching

  1. Back flexion stretch – knees to chest

  • Lie down on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Slowly bring one knee towards your chest and hold it with your hands.
  • Keep your other leg flat on the floor.
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat the same with the other leg.
  1. Supine Twist – Knee to chest with rotation

  • Lie down on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Bring one knee towards your chest and hold it with your hands.
  • Keeping your shoulders on the ground, gently rotate the knee towards the opposite side of your body.
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat the same with the other leg.
  1. Cat/ Cow Stretch

  • Start on your hands and knees, with your wrists under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
  • As you inhale, arch your back and lift your tailbone and head towards the ceiling, creating a “cow” shape.
  • As you exhale, round your spine, tucking your chin to your chest, creating a “cat” shape.
  • Repeat this stretch several times, flowing smoothly from one movement to the next.
  1. The Pelvic Tilt

  • Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Tighten your abdominal muscles and tilt your pelvis upward so your lower back presses into the floor.
  • Hold this position for 5-10 seconds and then relax.
  • Repeat this exercise 10 times.
  1. Sitting pigeon pose

  • Start in a seated position with your legs extended straight out in front of you.
  • Bend your right knee, bringing your right foot to the outside of your left knee.
  • Slowly lower your right knee to the ground on the outside of your left leg, keeping your left leg extended straight behind you.
  • Hold this stretch for 10-30 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat the same with the other leg.
  1. Figure 4 stretch

  • Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Cross your right ankle over your left knee.
  • Gently pull your left knee towards your chest, keeping your right ankle on top of your left knee.
  • Hold this stretch for 10-30 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat the same with the other leg.
  1. Standing hamstring stretch

  • Stand with your feet hip-width apart.
  • Bend forward at the waist and reach towards your toes, keeping your knees straight.
  • Hold this stretch for 10-30 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat this stretch several times.

Strengthening

  1. Forearm Plank

  • Start by positioning yourself on your forearms and knees, with your elbows under your shoulders.
  • Straighten your legs behind you and balance on your toes, keeping your body in a straight line from head to heels.
  • Hold this position for 10-30 seconds, keeping your abdominal muscles tight and your hips level.
  • Repeat this exercise several times.
  1. Bird Dog

  • Start on your hands and knees, with your wrists under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
  • Reach forward with your right arm and back with your left leg, keeping your spine in a neutral position.
  • Hold this position for a few seconds, then return to the starting position and repeat with the other arm and leg.
  • Repeat this exercise several times.
  1. Dead Bug

  • Lie on your back with your arms extended towards the ceiling and your legs raised towards the sky.
  • Lower your right arm and left leg towards the floor, keeping your lower back pressed into the ground.
  • Return to the starting position and repeat with the other arm and leg.
  • Repeat this exercise several times.
  1. Knees Side to Side

  • Start in a seated position with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Slowly move your knees from side to side, keeping your feet together.
  • Repeat this exercise 10-15 times.

It’s important to consult with a doctor or physical therapist to determine if these exercises are appropriate for your specific condition, and to ensure proper technique to avoid further injury.

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch then we can help too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk

Exercises for Deltoids

Strengthening

Lateral Raise:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding a pair of dumbbells at your sides
  • Slowly raise the weights to shoulder height, keeping your arms straight and hands facing forward
  • Hold for a second, then lower the weights back to the starting position
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions

Front Raise:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding a pair of dumbbells in front of your thighs
  • Slowly raise the weights up in front of you to shoulder height, keeping your arms straight
  • Hold for a second, then lower the weights back to the starting position
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions

Reverse Dumbbell Fly:

  • Lie face down on a flat bench with a pair of dumbbells hanging below your shoulders
  • With your palms facing each other, raise the weights up and out to your sides until your arms are parallel to the floor
  • Hold for a second, then lower the weights back to the starting position
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions

Barbell Upright Row:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell with your palms facing your thighs
  • Slowly raise the barbell up towards your chin, keeping it close to your body
  • Hold for a second, then lower the barbell back to the starting position
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions

Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press:

  • Sit on a bench with your feet flat on the floor and a pair of dumbbells at shoulder height
  • Push the weights straight up above your head until your arms are fully extended
  • Hold for a second, then lower the weights back to the starting position
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions

Stretching

Dynamic Bear Hug Stretch:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart
  • Reach your arms around your back and grab one wrist with the opposite hand
  • Use your arm to gently pull your shoulder blades together
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and release

Cross-body Rear Deltoid Stretch:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart
  • Reach your right arm across your body towards your left shoulder
  • Use your left hand to gently pull your right arm towards your body
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and repeat on the other side

Standing Chest and Shoulder Stretch:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart
  • Reach both arms behind your back and interlace your fingers
  • Lift your hands up towards the sky
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and release

One Arm Behind the Back Shoulder Flexor Stretch:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart
  • Reach your right arm behind your back, with your palm facing out
  • Use your left hand to gently pull your right arm up towards your back
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and repeat on the other side

One Arm Cross Body Stretch:

  • Reach your right arm across your body towards your left shoulder.
  • Use your left hand to gently pull your right arm towards your body, increasing the stretch in your shoulder and upper arm.
  • Hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat the stretch on the other side by reaching your left arm across your body towards your right shoulder.

If you want to know more about correct technique or would like professional advice from one of our personal trainers then please get in touch. Furthermore, if you are including lateral raises and shoudler exercsies into your regime and they are causing you some aches and pains, then we can help there too with our specialist sports massage service. For more information on how these types of massage could help you, contact us on 07939 212 739 or drop us an email at info@livewellhealth.co.uk